Off Topic Art & Literature

Discussion in 'Southampton' started by Beddytare, Nov 26, 2019.

  1. davecg69

    davecg69 Well-Known Member

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    Hate to be a pedant (actually, no I don’t :emoticon-0103-cool:), but it’s “Stephen King”, though I gather he’s comfortable being called “Steve”. I’d have loved to have met him, seeing as he’s generally my “go to” author and I bought a copy of “Carrie” in the US before they made the film and before he became famous. I love the way he can write true horror (“Salem’s Lot”, “Christine” ....) but also fantasy (“The Dark Tower”, “The Stand” etc) but also really interesting stuff like “11.22.63” - which is a cracking book by the way (imo). Great writer .....
     
    #381
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  2. Beddytare

    Beddytare Plays the percentage

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    sorry yes you are right looked at his signature on my one and only book of his.
     
    #382
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  3. thereisonlyoneno7

    thereisonlyoneno7 Well-Known Member

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    11.22.63 was excellent - so much better than the TV series.
     
    #383
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  4. Beddytare

    Beddytare Plays the percentage

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    I don't know if its me but I didn't enjoy "In the heart of the fire" By Dean Kootz. It got 4.5 stars but I only gave it a 3 .............Nah wasn't for me........Maybe just that book who knows.
     
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  5. davecg69

    davecg69 Well-Known Member

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    Told you, his later stuff has been very “meh” in my opinion (and this from a really big fan - now ex-fan - of his).
    IMO - his best were some of his earlier ones - “Strangers” and “Watchers” are his best.
    If you (like I do) liked Stephen Kings “The Stand) - and I’m thrilled to see they’re going to remake the TV series (better this time I hope) so yourself a favour and look out Robert McCammon’s “Swan Song” - I thought it was stunning. Would be interested to know if it was only me! :emoticon-0103-cool:
     
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  6. StJabbo1

    StJabbo1 Well-Known Member

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    Rooting through my boxes of books and came across a number of Kurt Vonnegut books looking forward to rereading.
     
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  7. Rorschach's Journal

    Rorschach's Journal Well-Known Member

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    Re Swan Song, I bought it many years ago but haven't currently got a copy
    So I looked online.
    After wading through the £125 - £500 first editions I found some less well cared for specimens and managed to get a cheap 2016 copy for £8.

    Long story short, the original book from 1987 (US) and 1988 (UK) are worth a mint if they're in good nick, so was kicking myself that I'd let my copy go. Thanks Dave for reminding me of it and then costing me an additional £8 :emoticon-0100-smile
     
    #387
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  8. davecg69

    davecg69 Well-Known Member

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    No worries, RJ! Glad to be of assistance <rushing off to look at his copy of the book - ooh goody, it’s 1988 Sphere U.K.) .... not that I’m planning on selling it, but my children probably will when I’m not around anymore ......... :emoticon-0103-cool:
     
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  9. It's Only A Game

    It's Only A Game Well-Known Member

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    In honour of Rabbie Burns born this day in 1759

    please log in to view this image


    please log in to view this image

    please log in to view this image
     
    #389
  10. ChilcoSaint

    ChilcoSaint Lives in a Chilcohüttl
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    Address to a Haggis
    Fair fa' your honest, sonsie face,
    Great chieftain o the puddin'-race!
    Aboon them a' ye tak your place,
    Painch, tripe, or thairm:
    Weel are ye worthy o' a grace
    As lang's my arm.

    The groaning trencher there ye fill,
    Your hurdies like a distant hill,
    Your pin wad help to mend a mill
    In time o need,
    While thro your pores the dews distil
    Like amber bead.

    His knife see rustic Labour dight,
    An cut you up wi ready slight,
    Trenching your gushing entrails bright,
    Like onie ditch;
    And then, O what a glorious sight,
    Warm-reekin, rich!

    Then, horn for horn, they stretch an strive:
    Deil tak the hindmost, on they drive,
    Till a' their weel-swall'd kytes belyve
    Are bent like drums;
    The auld Guidman, maist like to rive,
    'Bethankit' hums.

    Is there that owre his French ragout,
    Or olio that wad staw a sow,
    Or fricassee wad mak her spew
    Wi perfect scunner,
    Looks down wi sneering, scornfu view
    On sic a dinner?

    Poor devil! see him owre his trash,
    As feckless as a wither'd rash,
    His spindle shank a guid whip-lash,
    His nieve a nit;
    Thro bloody flood or field to dash,
    O how unfit!

    But mark the Rustic, haggis-fed,
    The trembling earth resounds his tread,
    Clap in his walie nieve a blade,
    He'll make it whissle;
    An legs an arms, an heads will sned,
    Like taps o thrissle.

    Ye Pow'rs, wha mak mankind your care,
    And dish them out their bill o fare,
    Auld Scotland wants nae skinking ware
    That jaups in luggies:
    But, if ye wish her gratefu prayer,
    Gie her a Haggis.
     
    #390

  11. davecg69

    davecg69 Well-Known Member

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    Let’s hope the Spurs team are all “wee timorous beasties” today! :emoticon-0103-cool:
     
    #391
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  12. Beddytare

    Beddytare Plays the percentage

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    Mum.....what’s a beasty........answer.........Your step father!!! (Or whoever takes your fancy<laugh>
     
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  13. Archers Road

    Archers Road Urban Spaceman

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    I’ve only read the one, Slaughterhouse Five. It made quite an impression on me; very funny, very dark, very clever.
     
    #393
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  14. StJabbo1

    StJabbo1 Well-Known Member

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    Plenty to get your teeth into. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Vonnegut
     
    #394
  15. Beddytare

    Beddytare Plays the percentage

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    Just finished another James Patterson book.......an Alex Cross book. His books of AlexCross is getting a bit same old same old.....or is it me?
     
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  16. hotbovril

    hotbovril Well-Known Member

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    I only recently discovered that the books were novelisations of the radio show and not vice versa.

    On another subject, whilst I haven’t read the whole thread, there has been much mention of Michael Connelly and Lee Child but none of Robert Crais. Crais is the Daddy of this genre and his Cole & Pike books are fabulous. Interestingly enough, he lives on the same street as Connelly, is friends with him and both have had each other’s characters make cameo appearances in their novels.
     
    #396
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  17. tiggermaster

    tiggermaster Well-Known Member

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    Agreed, Robert Crais is excellent. He was a script writer on Hill Street Blues back in the day..
     
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  18. Ian Thumwood

    Ian Thumwood Well-Known Member

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    Curious to read the enthusiasm for American writers here. I have read a number of books by Americans in the past , the most recent being Colson Whitehead's "The underground railroad." I feel there is a tendency for American writers to be a bit pretentious if they have literary aspirations. The Whitehead book was initially annoying but improved markedly once he got in to the story and I was very impressed by the premise of the book as soon as the principle characters fled the plantation where they were slaves. It's ending was also quite ambiguous which I really liked. The film rights for this book have now been snapped up. Other American writers I have tried have been less impressive. I read a Tom Clancy novel once about 20-odd years ago and thought it was appalling although I concur about Stephen King being a better writer than most people would take him for. Clancy really put me off American authors in a way that has not happened with writers from France, Denmark, and Australia who I have tried. It was just junk and made Wilbur Smith seem like a master wordsmith. These days I purposely avoid American writers and think the better quality British writers as actually more down to earth and can tell a story much better.( I have been massively impressed by Kate Atkinson's style of writing and her ability to craft nonlinear stories. Other English writers like Iain McEwan can tell a story in a unfussy and compelling manner which I feel often eludes American authors.) There was a really interesting article on the radio I came across this week about the American crime writer Harlan Cobin which intrigued me because the book has been remade in the UK where the story has now been re-set and the review suggested that the television version had mitigated against Cobins habit of writing rushed and unconvincing endings. The reviewers were hugely critical of Cobin's story telling ability which relied on putting questions in to the reader's mind to make them turn the page yet always failing at the end with an unconvincing attempt to tie up the lose ends. There are so many good writers in this country like McEwan, William Boyd, Reginald Hill, Philip Kerr and Kate Atkinson that I tend to play it safe when reading fiction.
     
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  19. thereisonlyoneno7

    thereisonlyoneno7 Well-Known Member

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    Is this 'The Stranger' on Netflix? Mrs No7 & I binge watched it the other day (lol we actually did all 7 episodes in one sitting finishing at 4:30am) and thought it was excellent, but there were one or two loose ends left.
     
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  20. Ian Thumwood

    Ian Thumwood Well-Known Member

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    This was the programme and book. I understand that the TV series was revised at the express request of the author but the results appear to have improved the story. It is usually the case that the books are better than the film / cinema series. The only other example that readily springs to mind is John Le Carre's "The Night Manager" which was transformed in the BBC series in to something far more sophisticated and satisfying.
     
    #400
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