Off Topic Art & Literature

Discussion in 'Southampton' started by St. Beddytare, Nov 26, 2019.

  1. RedandWhiteManofKent

    RedandWhiteManofKent Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2011
    Messages:
    3,858
    Likes Received:
    4,516
    There is one author I take a keen interest in.

    Fascinating, insightful, funny takes you to a magical place back in time.

    Not many people on here will have heard of Matthew Le Tissier but would certainly recommend.
     
    #41
    davecg69 and Archers Road like this.
  2. St. Beddytare

    St. Beddytare Plays the percentage

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2011
    Messages:
    9,316
    Likes Received:
    2,331
    I seem to remember that name from somewhere.............
     
    #42
  3. Archers Road

    Archers Road Urban Spaceman

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    40,370
    Likes Received:
    37,056
    Have you read a lot of Russian writer's?

    I really enjoyed Dostoevsky's The Gambler. Funny, clever, fast paced, profound. I struggled a bit with Crime and Punishment, found it a bit slow but I was glad I persevered with it. Couldn't finish Notes From The Undergound I'm afraid.

    Tolstoy was and imo always will be the towering genius of Russian literature. War and Peace is the most exceptional literary work I ever expected to come across, a deeply thought provoking and profoundly beautiful novel from a spiritual philosopher-poet. Then I read Anna Karenina, and he'd exceeded his own brilliant standards.

    Turgenev's Notes From a Hunter's Diary is a little gem of a story collection, if you haven't come across it before.

    I read all these guys in English so I'm aware I will have missed a lot. It's almost worth learning Russian, such is the depth of literary talent from that country.
     
    #43
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2019
  4. Archers Road

    Archers Road Urban Spaceman

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    40,370
    Likes Received:
    37,056

    Her husband wrote some outstanding poetry, and had an equally tragic mess of a life.
     
    #44
    Susan likes this.
  5. Farked19

    Farked19 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2019
    Messages:
    923
    Likes Received:
    965
    Jaroslav Hasek
     
    #45
  6. greensaint

    greensaint Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2011
    Messages:
    2,188
    Likes Received:
    1,841
    Ray Bradbury

    Massive amount of fine quality work, not just science fiction. He understood people, yet still believed the best was yet to come.
     
    #46
    SaintJabie and Kaito like this.
  7. Schrodinger's Cat

    Schrodinger's Cat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2011
    Messages:
    4,150
    Likes Received:
    5,147
    She kept his heart in a desk for a couple of years after his death. Odd lot, them and Lord Byron but certainly no lack of genius in those circles
     
    #47
    Susan and Archers Road like this.
  8. Libby

    Libby Not606's Top Interviewee

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    Messages:
    59,120
    Likes Received:
    51,628
    So we're allowed OT threads now then?
     
    #48
    fatletiss likes this.
  9. Archers Road

    Archers Road Urban Spaceman

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    40,370
    Likes Received:
    37,056

    Yeah, Byron was a fascinating character. Died on the battlefield didn't he? Keats was another of that crew who died young. Poets were the rock n rollers of the early 19th Century.
     
    #49
  10. The Ides of March

    The Ides of March Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2011
    Messages:
    9,890
    Likes Received:
    2,897
    Thank you for that. I will get that.
     
    #50

  11. Schrodinger's Cat

    Schrodinger's Cat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2011
    Messages:
    4,150
    Likes Received:
    5,147
    Died of a fever whilst fighting for Greek independence. Did well for a guy with a club foot. My fav poem by Byron is

    Lines Inscribed Upon a Cup Formed from a Skull

    Start not—nor deem my spirit fled:
    In me behold the only skull
    From which, unlike a living head,
    Whatever flows is never dull.

    I lived, I loved, I quaff'd, like thee:
    I died: let earth my bones resign;
    Fill up—thou canst not injure me;
    The worm hath fouler lips than thine.

    Better to hold the sparkling grape,
    Than nurse the earth-worm's slimy brood;
    And circle in the goblet's shape
    The drink of Gods, than reptiles' food.

    Where once my wit, perchance, hath shone,
    In aid of others' let me shine;
    And when, alas! our brains are gone,
    What nobler substitute than wine?

    Quaff while thou canst—another race,
    When thou and thine like me are sped,
    May rescue thee from earth's embrace,
    And rhyme and revel with the dead.


    Why not? since through life's little day
    Our heads such sad effects produce;
    Redeem'd from worms and wasting clay,
    This chance is theirs, to be of use.



    I love the verse in bold but the whole poem just resonated with me when I read it
     
    #51
    Archers Road likes this.
  12. Number 1 Jasper

    Number 1 Jasper Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2011
    Messages:
    19,177
    Likes Received:
    9,120
    Terry Pritchett .

    Neil Gaiman .

    Tolkien .

    Stephen King .

    Holly Black .

    Sergei Lukyanenko .

    Also love amongst other things the autobiography’s of

    Magnus Magnussen .

    Murray Walker .

    Raymond Baxter .

    just for Starters:)
     
    #52
    Schrodinger's Cat likes this.
  13. Archers Road

    Archers Road Urban Spaceman

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    40,370
    Likes Received:
    37,056

    I like the two lines above...

    And when, alas! Our brains are gone,
    What nobler substitute than wine?


    Those Romantics all liked a drink I think. When they weren't high on opium.

    Do you know Thomas DeQuincey btw? An essayist rather than a poet or novelist, and a friend of Wordworth and Coleridge in particular. Confessions of an English Opium Eater contains some extraordinary passages.
     
    #53
    Schrodinger's Cat likes this.
  14. hotbovril

    hotbovril Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2011
    Messages:
    2,572
    Likes Received:
    1,097
    I'll read anything but I have a real passion for Science-Fiction. In my humble opinion, nobody comes close to Iain M Banks. Dan Simmons' Hyperion and Endymion books are rightly lauded as masterpieces in the genre but Banks's Culture novels are simply phenomenal. The man was a social commentator beyond compare.
     
    #54
  15. thereisonlyoneno7

    thereisonlyoneno7 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2011
    Messages:
    9,758
    Likes Received:
    11,608
    About to say the same thing
     
    #55
    Le Tissier's Laces likes this.
  16. Schrodinger's Cat

    Schrodinger's Cat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2011
    Messages:
    4,150
    Likes Received:
    5,147
    Read "Confessions" many years ago when at uni, not very familiar with his writing though.
    I think it was a case of interesting times breed interesting people as far as the Romantic poets went.
     
    #56
    Archers Road likes this.
  17. Kaito

    Kaito Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2019
    Messages:
    673
    Likes Received:
    2,098
    The Gulag Archipelago by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

    My uncle John (a great humanist) kept pestering me to read it. I did eventually read it and found it incredibly desolate and harrowing, but also full of hope and an incredible struggle for freedom.
     
    #57
  18. Archers Road

    Archers Road Urban Spaceman

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    40,370
    Likes Received:
    37,056

    I might give that a try. I read Cancer Ward, which was similarly bleak, but also life affirming.

    And of course, A Day in the Life of Aleksandr Denitsovitch. I read that in a day, I think. Literally couldn't put it down.
     
    #58
    Kaito likes this.
  19. Saintkitagain

    Saintkitagain Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2019
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    44
    Knut Hamsun

    Hunger
    Mysteries
    Growth of the Soil
    Victoria

    Magnificent writer (if you can overlook the very dodgy political views)
     
    #59
  20. hotbovril

    hotbovril Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2011
    Messages:
    2,572
    Likes Received:
    1,097
    I've never
    I've never heard of it but glowing recommendations always excite me. I'll be on that as soon as I've finished my current book (The long way to a small, angry planet.)
     
    #60

Share This Page