Off Topic RIP April

Discussion in 'Hull City' started by Chazz Rheinhold, Apr 2, 2021.

  1. spesupersydera

    spesupersydera Well-Known Member

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    #41
  2. Chazz Rheinhold

    Chazz Rheinhold Well-Known Member

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    #42
  3. Duffens_Briefs

    Duffens_Briefs Well-Known Member

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    Maureen Houghton
    wife of City legend Ken.
    RIP
     
    #43
  4. John Ex Aberdeen now E.R.

    John Ex Aberdeen now E.R. Well-Known Member

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    Sad to hear that news, they live next door to my cousin, she will be upset as they got on well. RIP Maureen.
     
    #44
  5. Ron Burguvdy

    Ron Burguvdy Well-Known Member

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  6. Plum

    Plum Well-Known Member

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    #46
  7. originallambrettaman

    originallambrettaman Mod Moderator
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    Retail tycoon W Galen Weston has passed away peacefully at his home, at the age of 80.

    Probably not a name many know, but he's an enormously successful man, owning dozens of brands and retailers, from Selfridges, to Primark.
     
    #47
  8. Cambstiger

    Cambstiger Well-Known Member

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    Ran ABF, which also includes Twinings, one of my former employers.
     
    #48
  9. tigerscanada

    tigerscanada Well-Known Member

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    Quite a dynasty the Weston family on both sides of the Atlantic, with interests in lots of industries, primarily food. Charitable organisations too.
    RIP.


    For those interested:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galen_Weston
     
    #49
  10. DMD

    DMD Eh?
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    Bernie Madoff...
     
    #50

  11. DaveSpencer

    DaveSpencer New Member

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    George Reynolds
     
    #51
  12. FLG

    FLG Well-Known Member

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    That's a name to conjure with.
    Proper wrong'un he was.
     
    #52
  13. Help!

    Help! Well-Known Member

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    Actress Helen McCrory, 52, cancer.

    Genuinely shocked.
     
    #53
  14. Chazz Rheinhold

    Chazz Rheinhold Well-Known Member

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    Very sad


    British actress Helen McCrory has died at the age of 52.

    The talented star, who starred as Peaky Blinders matriarch Aunt Polly, in Harry Potter and the 2012 James Bond film Skyfall.
    In a heartbreaking statement confirming, her husband Damian Lewis wrote: "I'm heartbroken to announce that after a heroic battle with cancer, the beautiful and mighty woman that is Helen McCrory has died peacefully as home, surrounded by a wave of love from friends and family.

    "She died as she lived. Fearlessly. God we love her and know how lucky we are to have had her in our lives. She blazed so brightly. Go now, Little One, into the air, and thank you."
     
    #54
  15. originalminority

    originalminority Well-Known Member

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    RIP Helen, you were great in Peaky Blinders.
     
    #55
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  16. originallambrettaman

    originallambrettaman Mod Moderator
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    Very sad, she was a great actress.
     
    #56
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  17. Phinius T Bookbinder

    Phinius T Bookbinder Well-Known Member

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    Way too soon. Top actress. Sad news.
     
    #57
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  18. look_back_in_amber

    look_back_in_amber Well-Known Member

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    I absolutely loved Peaky Blinders, and she was excellent in it.

    RIP Helen <rose> <peacedove>
     
    #58
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  19. Chazz Rheinhold

    Chazz Rheinhold Well-Known Member

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    Zigger Zagger Zigger Zagger RIP


    Peter Terson obituary
    Playwright whose work, including Zigger Zagger, explored the poverty of choices faced by working-class men
    In 1967 the National Youth Theatre in London performed the first new play it had ever commissioned, with 80 performers arranged on a set depicting a football stand. The play would be revived with new casts eight times over the next 20 years, and again at Wilton’s Music Hall in London in 2017. It was televised twice, and entered the school curriculum. The play was Zigger Zagger, and its writer was Peter Terson, who has died aged 89.

    The story of teenager Harry Philton and his friend Zigger Zagger, who draws Harry into a band of rioting football fans, has as its timeless theme the poverty of choices faced by a young, working-class male. Terson continued his exploration of this subject the following year with his next National Youth Theatre play, The Apprentices (starring Barrie Rutter), in which exploited young men turn cruelly and violently on each other.

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    Peter Terson. More than 80 of his plays were performed in his lifetime
    Possibly no writer has done more to democratise drama in Britain. Earlier in his career, as a young resident playwright at the Victoria theatre, Stoke-on-Trent, brought in by its director, Peter Cheeseman, Terson plunged into the theatre’s dedication to regionalism, supported by postwar civic investment. Faithful to Cheeseman’s commitment to local documentaries about his audiences’ working lives, Terson’s scripts included The 1861 Whitby Lifeboat Disaster (1970).

    After the success of Zigger Zagger, he struck a wonderfully rich seam with three plays about three Yorkshire miners at leisure, played by Brian Glover, Ray Mort and Douglas Livingstone. The first of these, commissioned by BBC Radio, was The Fishing Party (1971), in which the trio are bullied and exploited by a ruthless Whitby landlady who assures them they will have “contact with a lavatory on all floors” at their lodgings. It won a Writers Guild award and was televised – as were the following two – as a BBC Play for Today. The second, Shakespeare or Bust (1973), centred around a canal trip to Stratford-upon-Avon to see Antony and Cleopatra that ends up with Antony (Richard Johnson) and Cleopatra (Janet Suzman) coming to their narrowboat after the three are unable to get tickets for the performance. The third, Three for the Fancy, set at a country livestock fair, followed in 1974, and the trilogy was at the heart of a celebratory retrospective at the British Film Institute in 2012.

    Peter was born in Walker, Newcastle upon Tyne, to Peter Patterson, a joiner, and his wife, Jane (nee Best). He left school at 15, worked in a drawing office and briefly attended the city’s technical college. After national service with the RAF he trained as a teacher at Redland College in Bristol (1952-54), and there met a fellow student Sheila Bailey, whom he married in 1955. He later changed his name, after becoming a professional writer, because he thought Peter Patterson a “bit of a mouthful”.

    Ten years teaching PE and history followed; he later admitted that “I wasn’t very good and the boys saw through me, but were very supportive”. Already writing, he had “enough rejection slips to paper the walls” until in 1964 Cheeseman read, liked and produced A Night to Make the Angels Weep at the Victoria theatre.





    The Fishing Party by Peter Terson, filmed for the BBC’s Play for Today in 1972
    Set in the Vale of Evesham in Worcestershire, where Terson then lived, the play told dark stories of rustic people whose lives are disoriented by the relentless tide of progress. Unschooled in stagecraft but with a flair for dialogue that combined naturalism with unforced poetry, Terson relished the Vic’s theatre-in-the-round set-up, which dispensed with the need for sets to negotiate.

    His next play, now as resident playwright at the Vic, the Mighty Reservoy (1964), was about a new reservoir built threateningly close to a village, whose keeper believes that an act of sacrifice is necessary to avert a tragedy.

    In 1965 he adapted the story Jock-at-a-Venture, by Arnold Bennett, into a play, Jock on the Go, that was seen by Michael Croft, founder-director of the National Youth Theatre, and that circumstance led to Zigger Zagger being taken up.

    Terson continued to write through the 1980s, and his play Strippers was produced in his home city of Newcastle and in the West End, making the connection between asset-stripping of old industries and the housewives who bared all to make up for the pay packets their men had lost.

    Always committed to work that was accessible to non-traditional theatre-going audiences, in the 90s he turned to writing large-scale community plays, working regularly with the director Jon Oram of Claque theatre, formerly the Colway theatre trust, and attracted by the instinct that many people with stories to tell had no way of telling them.

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    Peter Terson on the road with a horse-drawn caravan, part of his research for a play about Romany life
    His plays, of which more than 80 were performed in his lifetime, were, according to Oram, always works in progress right up to the opening night, and Terson recognised that amateurs took decisions differently from professionals. “If they said the sense of a line in their words rather than his, then he would shout out ‘that’s better’ and keep the words in,” said Oram. “He’d see something in someone and develop it in the script.”

    Terson also made sure he knew of what he was writing, on one occasion buying an authentic caravan, learning to harness a horse and setting out on the road, as he prepared to write about Romany life. When a genuine Romany challenged him to a fight, he accepted and lost two front teeth. The resulting “documentary play” for BBC Radio, The Romany Trip, was broadcast in 1983.

    On another occasion he went to Butlin’s at Minehead in Somerset to do karaoke before writing about a holiday camp in Sailor’s Horse (1999), a community play involving hundreds. His final produced play was Campers (2001), written for Edensor school in Stoke-on-Trent, about racist attitudes and two very different campsites – one a luxury French holiday site, and the other a refugee camp in the Balkans.

    Terson continued writing until the onset of Parkinson’s disease forced him to stop. He is survived by Sheila and their children, Neil and Janie, five grandchildren and a great-grand-daughter.

    Peter Terson (Patterson), playwright, born 24 February 1932; died 8 April 2021
     
    #59
  20. John Ex Aberdeen now E.R.

    John Ex Aberdeen now E.R. Well-Known Member

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    Me too, you could have knocked me down with a feather when I saw this news, I had no idea she was ill, a wonderful actress and taken far too soon.
    RIP Helen McCrory.
     
    #60
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